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My Dog Sleeps Under the Covers, Can He Breathe?

“My dog sleeps under the covers, can he breathe?” I mean, how exactly do they do that? I know it’s probably very worrying for you when your dog sleeps under the covers. Will they suffocate? And what about if you’re using a weighted blanket, can your dog breathe under those? And why do they even want to do this in the first place?

Well, while it might seem strange, this behavior is actually very common for dogs, which means the answers you’re looking for are well-known. In this article, we’ll give you all the information you’re after concerning these questions and more, plus we’ll fill you in on how to stop your dog from sleeping under the covers. Let’s get started!

Will My Dog Suffocate Under the Covers?

My Dog Sleeps Under the Covers, Can He Breathe?

Your dog will not suffocate under the covers. Dogs are able to breathe just fine while sleeping under the covers. In fact, many dogs actually like to sleep under the covers because it makes them feel warm and secure. As long as they’re not hiding out because they’re scared or anxious, then it’s nothing to worry about. Dogs descended from wolves and still enjoy closed-in spaces.

Pay attention for other signs from your dog that they might be having stress issues that are making them want to sleep under the covers, however. Are they generally a very anxious, timid dog? If something happens do they get so scared they want to be held like a baby? Do they also feel the need to be all the way between your legs under the covers?

These would be signs that your dog is doing this more because of fear and anxiety issues, rather than just for comfort. You need to begin addressing this right away, or further, even worse problems will develop. Skip to the last section where we’ll go over how to do that.

Can Dogs Breathe Sleeping Under Weighted Blankets?

Dogs cannot breathe sleeping under weighted blankets. Unlike regular blankets or covers, weighted blankets are much too heavy for a dog to be sleeping under. They are much too heavy for dogs to be able to breathe normally due to all the weight that is placed on their small chests.

Weighted blankets can also present a choking hazard to dogs that like to chew. Many of these types of blankets will contain small beads to add weight, which your dog could easily swallow if they were to begin chewing and break through the fabric.

Do not allow your dog to sleep under weighted blankets, even if they seem like they’re doing fine at the time.

Is it OK for My Dog to Sleep Under the Covers?

It is ok for your dog to sleep under the covers. Many dogs, especially of certain breeds like dachshunds, love to burrow. Sleeping under the covers is nice and comfy for them, and they’re able to breathe just fine. The only problem is if they’re doing so not because of comfort, but because they have fear and anxiety issues.

If your dog is generally frightened easily or often seeks out places to hide when they’re feeling stressed, don’t just brush it off when they’re responding to these feelings in these ways. Left untreated,  your dog’s problems will only get worse. Furthermore, you’d be allowing your dog to continue going through all kinds of awful feelings on a day-to-day basis that could easily be handled.

Continue to the last section to learn how to help your dog through anxiety and fear issues.

Why Does My Dog Sleep Under Covers?

Your dog sleeps under covers for a few possible reasons. One of the most common explanations is that they simply enjoy the feeling of being warm and enclosed. Dogs like to sleep under the covers because it makes them feel cozy and warm, just like we as humans do.

However, another possibility is that your dog is sleeping under covers because it’s their poor way of responding anytime they feel stressed or worried. In these cases, you need to handle things right away through behavioral training before the problem grows and gets worse. Continue to the next section where we’ll go over how to do that.

How to Stop Your Dog From Sleeping Under the Covers

To stop your dog from sleeping under the covers, first start by making somewhere nearby a more attractive option. Place a favorite blanket or their crate next to your bed with a treat or their favorite toy. Once they take it, encourage them to stay by giving them pets and praise. Be patient and continue to repeat this as necessary.

It may take some time, but your dog will soon learn that this is a more preferable spot for them. If they were motivated by fear or anxiety, however, then you’ll need to also begin on addressing those right away or their problems will only grow and escalate. Let’s start by thinking about what motivates dog behavior.

You’ve probably heard before that dogs are pack animals, and that in every pack there is a pack leader. They have many responsibilities, including protecting the pack, but they also have the job of instilling confidence in the other pack members. This helps make the entire pack more safe and secure.

While your dog does view you as their pack leader, right now you’ve failed at that important job of instilling confidence in them. That’s okay, though, because that’s very normal and it’s also a fairly easy thing to correct — provided that you have the right instructions of your own to follow.

That’s why I’d recommend an excellent free video series by a renowned trainer named Dan which will show you everything you need to know to be an effective pack leader for your dog. In it, he explains everything in ways that are very easy to understand and teach to your own dog, and he gets right to the point so that you’ll start seeing results in a hurry.

Start watching Dan’s free training series now by clicking here. And don’t worry, because you won’t ever have to be mean to your dog. In fact, you’ll never even have to raise your voice. Soon enough, you’ll have ridden your dog of all these awful feelings they’ve been carrying around on their shoulders, and you’ll have the loving, obedient, and most importantly, happy dog of your dreams.

I’m  sure you’re ready to see all these wonderful changes in your dog, so I’ll let you get started on things. Good luck with all of this, and thank you for reading “My Dog Sleeps Under the Covers, Can He Breathe?”